We've spent the past week bringing you stories of religion and violence from around the country – what happens when violence crosses thresholds in churches, synagogues and mosques? Here's a quick wrap-up, where you can find all the stories in one place.

Part 1: Just how common is violence in people's holy places? What are people doing to prevent and respond to attacks? This first story gives a general overview; the second is a guide of best practices – what should you do when faced with an active shooter? 

Part 2: What's the pulse of a faith community who's gone through violence? This story takes us to Ohio, where people are living in the aftermath of an arson attack on a mosque.

A proposal for the new mosque design hangs on the wall of the temporary space. The old mosque was destroyed in a fire in August 2012.

A proposal for the new mosque design hangs on the wall of the temporary space. The old mosque was destroyed in a fire in August 2012.

Part 3: How do you move on when your worship space has been destroyed, but you don't know who or what is behind it? Moving on is exactly what the people of Joplin are doing following a mysterious fire last year. 

Part 4: How do you balance service and safety – welcoming people in, but locking doors tight? That's what churches in Spokane are exploring.

The sanctuary today at Free Welcome Christian Church on Sellerstown Road near Whiteville, N.C. The church has spent the past 35 years trying to recover from bombings and shootings there in the 1970s.

The sanctuary today at Free Welcome Christian Church on Sellerstown Road near Whiteville, N.C. The church has spent the past 35 years trying to recover from bombings and shootings there in the 1970s.

Part 5: Whether it’s gunshots, fires or fists, when violence touches a congregation it’s felt in ripples, often for years to come – and that's the case in one North Carolina church community.

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